Hands-on with OnLive: Is this the future of PC gaming?

For high-end PC gamers, OnLive won’t replace your turbocharged, water-cooled quad-GPU gaming rig and the insane screen resolutions it can pump out, but for casual gamers who are interested in sampling the latest PC games, get ready to have your mind blown.
The much-hyped OnLive PC gaming servicehas soft-launched to a limited preview audience, and we’ve spent the past several days putting the streaming service through its paces. OnLive allows nearly any laptop or desktop to play high-end PC games, by offloading the CPU and GPU-intensive tasks of actually running the game software to a remote render farm, then beaming the gameplay back to you as a streaming video.
As unlikely as that scenario sounds, in practice the system actually works quite well, at least at these initial stages. The game selection is decent, the hardware requirements are very flexible, and the overall image quality and gameplay experience runs from acceptable to very good. The big question mark in OnLive’s future is how well the system will scale for a mass audience.
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Microsoft faces Android juggernaut

A market-dominating Microsoft smartphone may not be in the cards.
A killer Microsoft smartphone may always be out of reach. And Microsoft should understand this better than anyone.
Manufacturers and consumers of highly interactive computing devices–be they PCs or smartphones–naturally congregate around a common, widely supported operating system. Of course, that has been Windows or Apple software in the personal computing–i.e., laptop/desktop–world. Now it’s Google’s Android and Apple’s iPhone OS in the smartphone space.
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Spotify iOS 4 update now live: We test multitasked music

Spotify’s iPhone app has officially been updated to allow for multitasking — it’s now possible to listen to your favourite choons while using other apps, plus a host of new social features
“It’s here, it’s here!” we cry with the excitement of a child rushing to the door to greet the postman, who has in his postbag the send-off cereal toy they ordered approximately six to eight weeks ago. Except we’re grown ups, and the toy is in fact the long awaited firmware update for Spotify’s iPhone app.
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iPhone 4G: Cool or tool? Have your say in our poll

It's only a few short days before Steve Jobs takes the stage at Apple's World Wide Developers Conference, probably to unveil the new iPhone 4G. Let us know how you feel in our poll
This coming Monday, Steve Jobs will take the stage at Apple's annual World Wide Developers Conference, and the smart money (read -- crazy Internet hype machine) says he will unveil the much anticipated, even much-er leaked iPhone 4G.
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4 out of 10 iPhones sold to business users

Evidently, Apple has succeeded in overcoming enterprise's early misgivings about the iPhone's security and business-readiness.
"Five hundred dollars? ... That is the most expensive phone in the world. And it doesn't appeal to business because it doesn't have a keyboard."--Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer on the iPhone, January 2007
Who was it, again, who said Apple's iPhone "doesn't appeal to business because it doesn't have a keyboard"?
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Cloud Browse lets you view Flash on iPhone

Sneaking past Apple's aversion to Flash on the iPhone, the free Cloud Browse app connects you to a remote PC where you can browse the Web and view your favorite Flash content.
If you can't view Flash sites directly through your iPhone, why not connect to a remote PC where you can?
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Apple to add HD Radio in future devices?

A recent patent application from Apple could signal the inclusion of an HD Radio feature to be added in future iOS devices.
A recent Apple patent application could signal the company is looking to include an HD Radio feature in future iOS devices. An HD radio tuner would let devices scan radio broadcasts as well as do content-based searches for stations playing particular songs, genres, artists, and so on.
According to AppleInsider, Apple's patent would bring the trademarked wireless radio format, HD Radio, owned by iBiquity to future generations of iPhones, iPads, and iPods. The application details the potential user experience, stating, "enhanced metadata and searching can provide the listener the ability to refine station choices without having to listen at length to any particular station, and further can facilitate tagging broadcast tracks for subsequent access and/or purchase."
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Requiem for the Kin – Video

Sonos and Roku considering becoming better friends
Go inside Facebook’s election war room
Netflix proves it’s still growing like crazy
Paul Allen passes away at 65
Google says it won’t work with Defense Department on developing AI weapons
Google says China is important to explore — even if it means censorship
Radical new engine makes a run at reality
New rumors about the 2018 iPad Pros
Palm is back! But this 3.3-inch device isn’t a phone at all
Apple’s October event: What we’re expecting
Explaining 5G with a game of pool
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Huawei Watch GT bulks up on battery life, loses Wear OS
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Kindle Paperwhite gets waterproof redesign, adds Bluetooth and more storage
Pixel 3’s stellar camera ups the ante again
Montblanc Summit 2 smartwatch adds fitness and longer battery life… and costs nearly $1,000
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10 tips and tricks for the Pixel 3
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Apple antenna issue a ‘physics problem,’ not a software problem

Tech blog Anandtech goes hands-on with the iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS, and Nexus One to find out if the antenna issue is unique to the iPhone 4's hardware or software.
Almost a week after the iPhone 4's launch, questions remain over why users experience signal loss when gripping the phone in a particular way.
Apple has called this a "non issue," despite users being able to repeatedly reproduce the problem. In the meantime, it's been suggested that it might be a problem that can be fixed with a software update. Others have said, and Apple has suggested, that users buy a case to prevent fingers from coming in direct contact with the antennas built into the metal band surrounding the iPhone 4.
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5-bar phone signal: What’s it get you? (FAQ)

Apple’s explanation of why the iPhone 4 is having so many reception issues has called into question what the 5-bar signal strength icon really means.
Apple’s recent explanation of iPhone 4 reception issues–that they’re linked to Apple’s miscalculation of how it measures signal strength on iPhones–has left many people wondering what that five-bar icon displayed on the phone really means.
Earlier on Friday, Apple issued a statement blaming iPhone reception issues on a software miscalculation rather than on hardware design. Since the iPhone 4 launched last week, thousands of consumers have complained that when gripping the phone around the lower left-hand corner of the device, the signal degrades or calls are dropped.
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